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Authors: Juanita Jane Foshee

Blossoms of Love

Blossoms of Love
Juanita Jane Foshee
CreateSpace (2011)

The Blossoms of Love 

The story of Lamont Ellman, second born of six sons to Dorothy and John Ellman. Raised on a Montana ranch, Lamont is the first son to leave home in search of his destiny. He joins the Navy and travels the world. In the Navy, Lamont meets David Agar who turns out to be his life-long friend and brother-in-law. Lamont marries Natalie, the daughter of a wealthy Mobile, Alabama, businessman, and takes her home to Montana. But Natalie, being used to all the comforts money can buy, soon becomes restless and returns to Mobile destroying Lamont and all his hopes for a family. Natalie may remain out of Lamont’s house but never out of his life. 

While trying to run away from his loneliness, Lamont meets an old acquaintance, Barbara, whom he met while serving in the Navy. Lamont realizes that Barbara is the true love of his life and a strong and determined woman. Lamont soon re-enlists in the Navy as the second world war grips the nation. Barbara’s love for Lamont and devotion to his family drives her to become the cornerstone of the Ellman family during repeated tragedies and losses as a result of the war. Her strong will and determination to wait for Lamont keep her going day after day until the love of her life is reported dead. 

Driven by his determination to keep his promise to return to Barbara, Lamont survives two years as a prisoner of war and returns to find a son he never knew existed. However, the tragedies don’t end with the war. Barbara and Lamont no sooner begin their life together when Barbara is stricken with breast cancer. 

Resolved never to let the blossoms of their love die, they face the illness together and overcome the disease. Now ready to continue their lives together, they are faced with yet another hurdle. Natalie’s son. After a long bout with illness, Lamont is laid to rest in his beloved Montana mountains. Eight years later, Barbara is killed in an accident while visiting Lamont’s grave. Over the headstone of the graves, “The Blossoms of Our Love Will Never Die.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blossoms of Love

 

by

 

Juanita J. Foshee

 

 

 

 

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This book is dedicated to Juanita Jane Foshee and to honor her for her contribution to our society through her writings and other talents such as, art work and paintings.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Juanita Jane Foshee

 

 

 

 

 

Born in River Rouge, Michigan on June 18, 1927, the daughter of Homer C. and Mary Sue Evans.

 

The family moved to Homer's home town, Stevenson, Alabama where, Jane as she was known to all her friends, attended school. During her tenure at Stevenson High School, Jane wrote several books which to this day remain unpublished.

 

After marrying her high school sweetheart, George T. Foshee Jr., Jane wrote several other books, also unpublished.

 

Taken from the original manuscript, this book is now published and offered to the public. We hope you enjoy it.

 

Jane is survived by her, sons Homer W. Foshee, and George T. Foshee, III, daughter in law Sherry Foshee, granddaughters Selena May, Amanda Foshee and Jennifer Foshee, grandsons George T. Foshee, IV and Jason May and great granddaughter Leah Grace May

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On a hot Sunday, the Ellmans were outside. The children were playing in the yard when a police car drove up. The policeman got out of the car. He said, “Mrs. Ellman, I have a telegram from the Navy to you.” Everyone froze. “Oh no, not again.” Mrs. Ellman said, “Which one this time?” Johnny said, “It’s Monty.” Barbara screamed, “No! No! He promised he would come back.” “He was shot down over enemy territory.” Mrs. Ellman asked, “Is—he dead?” The policeman said, “They don’t know.” Barbara said, “He will be home. I know he will. He promised me.”

The Blossoms of Love

 

Chapter One - Lamont Ellman

 

• Second of six sons

• Lives on a horse ranch in Montana

• Enlists in the Navy

• Marries Natalie

 

Chapter Two

 

• Trouble in the marriage

• Lamont tries to run from his memories

• World War

 

Chapter Three

 

• Lamont re-enlists

• Missing in action

• The pregnancy

 

Chapter Four

 

• The recovery

• The son he never knew existed

 

Chapter Five

 

• A surprise visit from Natalie

• Settling down to a normal life

• Another battle, but this time for Barbara

 

Chapter Six

 

• Lost in Montana

• Peace at last, together forever

This is the story of Lamont Ellman and his family. He is the second of six sons born to Dorothy and John. The Ellman’s live on a small ranch in Montana. The ranch gives them a fair living, but with six growing boys they had no extra money. John worked his sons as soon as they were old enough to handle a horse.

The oldest son, Johnny, is dark haired and has his mother’s eyes. Lamont is two years younger. Everyone calls him Monty. His hair and eyes were like his fathers, blue eyes and blond hair. Lamont was a very handsome boy. Some people even thought he was beautiful, but his looks deceived them. He was rugged, rough, and tough. Berry, the third son, had the blond hair but his eyes were brown. He and Johnny were the quiet ones. Leon, the fourth son, had dark hair and eyes. He was always making someone laugh. Paul, the fifth son, could also be Leon’s twin. He was the smartest one. The sixth and last son, Allen, looked like Lamont except he was bigger and taller.

This story starts on Johnny’s 16
th
birthday. Mr. Ellman helped Johnny and Lamont load cattle on a big truck. The boys were taking them to town to sell. On their way to town, Lamont had an idea. He looked at Johnny who was driving. He asks, “Don’t they have the big rodeo in town tonight?” Johnny answered, “Yea, I read about it in the paper yesterday.” Lamont grinned and said, “We could go. It would be your birthday present from me.” Johnny glanced at him and said, “Are you crazy? Dad would whip the daylights out of us if we don’t go right back. We don’t have any money and we can’t spend Dad’s.”

Lamont laughed as he said, “We don’t need any money. I know where we can slip in and not be noticed.” Johnny gave a long sigh, “I don’t think we should.” Lamont begged, “Please Johnny, we ain’t never seen a big rodeo. I’m willing to take a whipping from Dad if we can see it.” Johnny said, “I don’t know why I let you talk me into things I know will get us into trouble.” He smiled at Lamont, “Okay, we’ll go. I just wonder if it will be worth the whipping Dad will give us. It better be little brother.”

The boys went to the stock yards and sold the cattle. The rodeo had just started when they got there. They slipped inside and no one saw them. The two young boys enjoyed the rodeo so much they forgot about the punishment they would get when they got home. They talked about the rodeo all the way home. It was midnight when they got home. Mrs. Ellman was waiting for them in the kitchen as the boys quietly came in the back door. They were surprised to see her. She asked angrily, “Where have you boys been?” Johnny answered, “We went to the rodeo in town, Mom.” She looked at her oldest two sons, “You boys know we don’t have money to spend for things like that.” Lamont said, “We didn’t spend any of Dad’s money. We got in free.” She asked, “What do you mean?” Lamont answered, “We slipped in without anyone seeing us.”

Mrs. Ellman signed, “Boys, you know that’s dishonest. We try to raise all of you to be honest and truthful.” Lamont said, “Mom, it was Johnny’s birthday and we didn’t have any money.” He looked at his mother, “It was my fault. I talked Johnny into going.”

Their mother gave a long sigh, “Well it’s done but don’t ever do this again. Your father went to bed early, he was so tired. I won’t tell him this time. Now go to bed.”

The two oldest Elllman sons kissed their mother and thanked her for not telling their father. Dorothy didn’t like keeping anything from her husband, but she thought it best not to tell him about this. The boys did work very hard.

When the boys were upstairs in bed Johnny said, “Boy, am I glad Mom’s not gonna tell Dad. He would just about kill us.” Lamont said, “I told you everything would be alright.” Johnny signed, “Yea, you told me.”

Lamont was glad winter had come. They wouldn’t have to work as hard and he could go hunting. He spent all of his spare time in the mountains. Often on weekends, he would spend the whole time walking in the woods or staying in the old cabin that his father built high in the mountains when they were small. Mr. Ellman used to hunt a lot until he had a light heart attack nearly a year ago. Many times he fed his family for weeks from the animals he killed. He was glad Lamont liked to hunt as much as he did.

Christmas Eve was here. Mrs. Ellman was busy in the kitchen cooking for her family. She always made her cakes a day or two ahead. She always prepared a turkey and a big ham for their Christmas dinner, and of course all the trimmings.

The boys were running in and out of the kitchen wanting to taste this and that. John and his three oldest sons went to the mountains to get a tree. The Ellman’s enjoyed Christmas. They didn’t have much money for presents but they always had plenty to eat. After eating their evening meal, the whole family decorated the tree. When the lights were turned on, Dorothy would bring in the popcorn and candy. They would admire the three as they ate the goodies. The older boys got clothes and the smaller ones got one toy for Christmas.

Two years passed quickly for Dorothy because her boys were growing up fast. Johnny graduated high school. John and Dorothy were very happy when Johnny told them he wanted to stay home and help his father on the ranch. As the family sat at the dinning table eating lunch, Johnny looked up from his plate, then at his father. “Dad, I know you need me here to help you. I’ve decided to stay here and be a rancher like you. I believe we can make this ranch really pay off. Maybe in the future we can even buy more land.”

Mr. Ellman smiled, “With your help, I think we can too. I’m glad you have made that choice. You’re right son, I do need you. Lamont can’t do all of the work until Berry learns more.” John sighed, “I just can’t do the work I did before I had the heart attack.” Lamont replied, “We don’t want you to Dad.” Lamont looked at his brother say, “Berry is learning fast, so is Leon. It won’t be long until Dad will have a lot of help.”

Paul and Allen had their jobs around the house. When spring came, Berry was doing a man’s work just like Johnny and Lamont. He was like Johnny, he liked working on the ranch.

As the months passed, the ranch was beginning to pay off. The next spring, John bought more stock. He was very happy because the ranch was finally paying it’s way and he had all of his sons working on the range except Allen. Allen was only ten years old. John didn’t start working them on the range until they were twelve.

Lamont graduated from high school in May. Two days later, as the family was eating their evening meal, Lamont looked at his mother, then his father. He cleared his throat. Everyone looked at him. He announced, “I have something to tell all of you.” Everyone waited to hear what he had to say. Lamont waited a second then said, “I joined the Navy yesterday.”

Johnny and Berry were not surprised. Lamont had been talking to them about the Navy. Dorothy looked at her second son with tears in her eyes and said, “I was wishing you would stay here like Johnny.” Johnny said, “Mom, we won’t all stay on here.” Leon said, “That’s right Mom, I want to be a scientist.” Paul said, “I want to be a doctor.” Lamont looked at his father, “Dad, you haven’t said a word.” He could see the disappointment on his father’s face. John took a sip of his coffee. His wife and all of the boys were looking at him. He finally said, “What is there to say? Monty has his mind made up. He’s already joined the Navy.”

Lamont said, “I want to see the world, I want to see how other people live. Dad I’m sure you can make it without me now. You’ve got all of us on the range now except Allen. He will be on the range in a year and a half.” John said, “Yes, I can make it without you. Go son, get this wild, restless feeling inside of you out of your system. When you do, you’ll be back home to stay.” Dorothy asked, “When do you have to leave?” Lamont answered, “I have a week before I leave.”

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